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May 2016 Archives

What's The Difference Between Arbitration And Mediation?

When serious conflicts arise over such family law matters as property division, child or spousal support, or child custody, it is not always necessary to go to court. Two alternative dispute resolution methods open to families are mediation and arbitration. Both share many similar advantages, but each method is very different in how it generates a resolution.

Dividing Debts For After Separation

In our last post, we talked about the need to have supporting proof for the precise date when a couple decides to separate. This is particularly important for those who separate but continue to live together since the official date is a key piece of information for dividing family property and debts.

Living Together But Still Separated - Doing It The Right Way

The concept of a "legal separation" sometimes comes up when couples in conflict look to end their relationship. In British Columbia, no such formal status actually exists. There are no official forms or documents to make a separation valid, and no need to go to court before a judge. But, although it's most common for separated couples to live apart, spouses can still be considered separated even if both live under the same roof.

The Face Of Divorce Amid Vancouver’s Booming Housing Market

Property division and support issues have never been simple to navigate, but changing times have a way of raising new and complex issues for couples in conflict. One such development was illustrated in a case the case of Lamont v. Johnson. After the divorce in 2008, the husband, Lamont, agreed to walk away with $130,000 in RRSPs while the wife, Johnson, kept the matrimonial home, valued at $700,000 at the time.

Parental Alienation — A Serious Complication In Child Custody

Children caught in the middle of parental hostility – it’s a sad reality in many divorce cases. But a recent ruling by the Supreme Court Of British Columbia showed what can happen when conflict and custody cross the line into an increasingly studied area called parental alienation.