Peterson Stark Scott
Schedule your consultation
(604) 634-2308 or
(800) 675-2419
View Our Practice Areas

August 2017 Archives

British Columbia family law: Domestic contracts becoming popular

Domestic contracts are becoming increasingly popular in the relationship world. British Columbia family law paves the way for such contracts which can stipulate how partners wish to arrange their finances and other areas of their lives such as property ownership and other issues in the event of the relationship ending. An agreement of this sort can be fashioned at any point in the partnership -- prior to marriage or cohabitation or after.

B.C. collaborative law: Embracing the happy divorce

Divorce can bring out the mean in people, but it doesn't have to be that way. More British Columbia residents who are separating are embracing collaborative law suggestions and choosing to consciously uncouple with a smile on their faces. It beats a long, drawn-out litigation process.

B.C. woman loses child support funds based on family law rules

A woman whose husband is not the father of her son will not be getting child support from him. Apparently, the woman kept the parentage of her son a secret from her spouse. In this unusual family law situation, a British Columbia judge said that when the child was born, there was no doubt the woman's husband believed he was the father, and his name was listed on the birth certificate. 

B.C. divorce mediation helps fashion parenting plan checklist

Divorcing couples with children would do well to adopt a parenting plan checklist when it comes to co-parenting their children. Moving forward amidst separation, divorce mediation for separating British Columbia couples may make the difference between a relatively amicable situation and one that is wrought with anger, frustration and fear. Part of those mediation sessions should include the development of a checklist.

British Columbia polyamorists face unique family law challenges

Polyamory literally means many loves. Polyamorous relationships have more than two people involved romantically and all agree that it is acceptable. But even so, British Columbia residents involved in polyamorous relationships may have unique circumstances when it comes to family law.