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Posts tagged "Family Law"

Canada family law: Child support and unmarried couples

Costs of raising children are escalating and most often it takes two parents to care for them, including financially. Family law rules typically provide that when legally married couples divorce in Canada, the parent who earns the most money and who usually is not the primary caregiver pays child support to the parent with whom the children are living. But what happens when the parents never married?

How the British Columbia courts look after family law cases

Different courts deal with various aspects of the law. That is also true for family law cases. Essentially, there are two court bodies in British Columbia that speak to family situations. Those are the Supreme Court of British Columbia and the Provincial Court.

British Columbia family law: Registering kids as gender unknown

Canada is generally known as a progressive country. That progression may continue if babies born in Canada need not be registered as either male or female, but as gender unknown. A child born in British Columbia was issued a gender non-specific health card -- the first in the world. Some rules under the family law umbrella continue to evolve.

B.C. family law: Shared custody helps young children

One of the most important things for children whose parents are going through a divorce is letting them know everything will be all right. Family law in British Columbia always takes into consideration the best interests of any children involved in the proceedings. Some young children don't do well with change, and a change in their family dynamic may cause them undue stress and anxiety.

Family law in British Columbia: Breaking divorce news to children

Children -- even adult children -- usually have a difficult time with the revelation that their parents are splitting up. There are provisions under the family law umbrella in British Columbia that give separating parents the tools to broach the subject with their families. As with most things in life, honesty seems to be the best policy.

Family law: When religious rules favour one parent over another

Shariah law in the Islamic world always favours giving fathers custody of children when a couple is separating. Family law in British Columbia doesn't always see things from that perspective. These Shariah rulings are legal in Middle East countries like Syria, Lebanon, Egypt and Jordan. Thousands of these people have dual citizenship with Canada, and therein lies the legal conundrum.

British Columbia family law: Domestic contracts becoming popular

Domestic contracts are becoming increasingly popular in the relationship world. British Columbia family law paves the way for such contracts which can stipulate how partners wish to arrange their finances and other areas of their lives such as property ownership and other issues in the event of the relationship ending. An agreement of this sort can be fashioned at any point in the partnership -- prior to marriage or cohabitation or after.

B.C. woman loses child support funds based on family law rules

A woman whose husband is not the father of her son will not be getting child support from him. Apparently, the woman kept the parentage of her son a secret from her spouse. In this unusual family law situation, a British Columbia judge said that when the child was born, there was no doubt the woman's husband believed he was the father, and his name was listed on the birth certificate. 

Gender issues embroiled in British Columbia family law

In a world that is becoming more inclusive of differences, gender issues have surfaced as volatile subject matter. Indeed, the complexities of gender in the 21st century have made their mark on family law, especially in British Columbia. A baby born in the province has been issued a health card that does not indicate gender -- purported to be the first in the world.