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divorce Archives

Divorce happens when the give and take ups and goes

People get into relationships with all sorts of preconceived notions. The honeymoon phase doesn't last forever and if couples in Canada don't work on their marriages or partnerships, they may soon be heading for splitsville and ultimately a divorce. So, instead of giving each other the cold shoulder, couples might realize that there may be times when they expect too much from the mate and honest communication may be the way to remedy that issue.

Getting around divorce bullying in Canada

The end of a marriage can bring out the worst in people. No couple in Canada ever marries with divorce in mind, but when situations change and life gets tough, some fences can't be mended. The only recourse for some couples is to separate. But, there may be times when one partner holds a grudge or is angry and he or she may resort to bullying tactics during divorce proceedings. There are ways to handle such behaviour.

Divorce in Canada: Reducing the tension

No couple wakes up one morning and decides today is the day for a marriage breakup. Couples in Canada make the decision to divorce most often when all avenues to rectify problems in a marriage have been exhausted. Although divorce can take its toll both emotionally and physically on the individuals and their family members -- especially children -- there are some things that can be done to minimize the stress a divorce can cause.

Divorce can be a positive outcome for a negative situation

When a couple calls it quits today, it's not the end of the world. Gone is the stigma divorce carried in the mid-20th century in Canada. In fact, many conscious uncouplings today are done with the spouses remaining good friends for the sake of each other and for their children. Individuals are celebrating rather than hibernating after what used to be considered a catastrophic life event.

Many marriages in Canada end in divorce at the start of the year

January is the month for new beginnings and, apparently, for endings. The first month of the year seems to be the month when many marriages in Canada come to an end, or at least the month when people think about separating or divorcing. In fact, January has become known as the divorce month.

Dignified divorce in Canada in the modern age

Ending a marriage today isn't what it used to be back in the 40s and 50s. In fact, more modern married couples in Canada are looking upon divorce as a chance to grow separately as individuals yet still remain friends with their former spouses. There are times when great parents make terrible couples, yet they want to remain friends for the sake of their children.

Does divorce contribute to chid poverty in Canada?

Married couples with kids who get divorced may literally be putting their children in the poor house, say some experts. Apparently, divorce contributes to child poverty, according to recent Statistics Canada census data. There are 1.2 million children who live in low-income families -- more the 531,000 in single-parent households, or one-fifth of them -- are living in poverty.

The right way to a good divorce in Canada

Calling it quits is a difficult decision for most couples, regardless of the reasons. But there are ways to make divorce go more smoothly in Canada and perhaps be more palatable, as it were. One of those ways is for couples to treat each other with respect in front of children they may have.

Getting the most from a divorce settlement in British Columbia

Ending a marriage is never easy, but it can be fair to both parties. Mediation goes a long way to help British Columbia couples going through a divorce to settle things fairly and amicably. In addition to lawyers, financial planners might also be a part of the team to help individuals get the most from their settlements in terms of looking at each person's financial needs during the divorce process.

Grey divorce in B.C.: Long-time married couples splitting

Some couples that have been married for years -- sometimes decades -- are calling it quits. "Grey" divorce, as it's known, is a stark reality for many British Columbia couples. The reasons for these splits are varied, but among them is simply growing apart once children have left home. Baby boomers -- those aged 55 and older -- are making a dent in divorce statistics in Canada. In fact, Statistics Canada has indicated the main indicators couples cite for these break-ups are falling out of love and having different ideas about retirement plans.